Hawaiian Airlines Q2 2023 Results

Hawaiian Airlines Q2 2023 Results

DALLASHawaiian Airlines (HA) parent Hawaiian Holdings has reported a loss of US12.3m for Q2 2023. This was down from the US$47.4m loss during the same period last year.

Revenue for the quarter rose by 2.2% to US$707m from US$692m in Q2 2022. Passenger numbers were also up 8.7% from last year to 2.8 million for the three months, with an average load factor of 90.4% for North American routes and 75.3% for its inter-island services.

“I want to thank our team members who have been taking care of our guests in a dynamic operating environment,” said Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO Peter Ingram. “Demand remains strong throughout our network, and we have recently seen a significant increase in bookings by travelers in Japan, an important geography that has trailed in the recovery of the overall market. Against the backdrop of improving operations and robust demand, I am excited about the major initiatives we’re on track to deliver in the second half of the year.”

As COVID restrictions eased, HA relaunched thrice-weekly services from Honolulu (HNL) to Fukuoka (FUK), Japan, on April 28. This saw its capacity on the Japanese market return to around 70% of pre-pandemic levels. It also commenced a weekly service to Rarotonga (RAR) on May 20.

Hawaiian Airlines N209HA Airbus A321Neo. Photo: Andrew Henderson/Airways.

Fleet Issues


The airline also revealed that delivery of its first Boeing 787-9 has been delayed by around two months and is now expected in Q1 2024. However, Ingram said that the airline “didn’t actually expect to have the 787 in operation before early 2024 anyway, so… no changes to our 2023 plans.”

Three out of the 12 787s ordered are expected to be delivered in 2024. All should be in the fleet by 2027. The Dreamliner will be fitted with the airline’s new business-class product, the Leihōkū Suits. Thirty-four of these will be installed with ‘fully flat beds, privacy doors, and shared double suites.’

Ingram also noted that issues around the Pratt & Whitney PW1000G engines on its Airbus A321neo fleet have eased in recent months. At one point, HA had five of its 18-strong fleet grounded.

However, on July 25, Pratt & Whitney announced that it needed to inspect around 1,200 of its PW1000G engines. The latest recall will no doubt have an effect on the Honolulu-based carrier, although Ingram added that “We think it is a limited number of… specific engines that need to be worked on,” and therefore, the impact on the operation has yet to be fully “calibrated.”


Featured Image: N392HA Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330-200 KLAX LAX. Photo: Brandon Farris/Airways.

European Deputy Editor
Writer and aviation fanatic, Lee is a plant geek and part-time Flight Attendant for a UK-based airline. Based in Liverpool, United Kingdom.

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