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PAS19: NAC Boosts A220 Program, Flynas Joins in on XLR Success

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PAS19: NAC Boosts A220 Program, Flynas Joins in on XLR Success

PAS19: NAC Boosts A220 Program, Flynas Joins in on XLR Success
June 20
10:31 2019

PARIS – On the fourth day of the Paris Airshow 2019, Airbus has scored more orders for its recently launched A321XLR, as well as for their A220s.

Nordic Aviation Capital (NAC) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) for 20 A220s. NAC also signed a large order with ATR during day two. One of the largest orders of the show.

NAC has over 76 airline partners worldwide, where their aircraft are leased to, on long term leases.

This is their first order for the A220 family, which is another big boost to the program.

The A220 has also bet it’s rival Embraer’s E1 and E2 programs for orders at this year’s Paris Airshow. The only victory for Embraer was securing a deal with KLM for up to 35 Embraer E195-E2s.

Saudi Arabian low-cost airline Flynas has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for 10 A321XLRs, as well as conversions for 10 A320neos, into 10 A321neos.

Founded in 2007, Flynas is Saudi Arabia’s first low-cost airline.

In 2018 Flynas carried 6.6 million passengers and operates an all Airbus fleet of 30 A320ceos and two A320neos.

This order shows Airbus isn’t finished at the Paris Airshow, as they have secured orders for more than 200 A321XLRs since it’s launch, which has stolen the show, at this year’s airshow.

The A220 gains another lessor customer after Airbus acquired the program from Bombardier last year, which shows the A220 has a lot of potential with airlines.

Interestingly Airbus did not receive a signal order for the A350 family or the smaller A33neo variant, the A330-800, which so far only has two customers, Kuwait Airways and Uganda Airlines.

The same can be said about Boeing and their flagship Boeing 777x program. Both manufacturers largest widebody offerings have the field to gain orders at the show.

As this year’s Paris Airshow starts to draw to a close, this shows the industry is shifting to aircraft the operate more point to point flights, rather than hub to hub flights.

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Daniel Sander

Daniel Sander

A Scottish Avgeek, based near Glasgow, Scotland. Has a massive passion for Aviation, runs a YouTube channel with over 7,000 Subscribers, Studies Tourism Management and writes for Airways during his free time.

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