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PAS19: American Airlines Orders 50 Airbus A321XLRs

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PAS19: American Airlines Orders 50 Airbus A321XLRs

PAS19: American Airlines Orders 50 Airbus A321XLRs
June 19
10:27 2019

PARIS – American Airlines has found the replacement for its Boeing 757-200 fleet. Today, the airline placed an order for 50 Airbus A321XLR aircraft.

The agreement between the Dallas/Ft. Worth-based carrier and Airbus states that 30 of these A321XLR aircraft are from slots originally assigned to AA’s previous A321neo order. The remaining 20 planes will be firm commitments.

With this order registered into Airbus’ backlog, American Airlines has 115 Airbus A321neos and A321XLRs on order—more than enough to replace the carrier’s 20-year-old Boeing 757s.

Comparing the A321XLR and the 757 capacity wise, both airliners offer the airline about 190 seats in a two-class configuration. However, the A321XLR will give American Airlines a longer range capability than what the 757 has to offer.

American Airlines will be able to operate the A321XLR from the U.S. East Coast into medium-sized European cities. A perfect example would be between the carrier’s hub in Chicago and Paris, or New York and Rome.

The A321XLR will also offer the carrier 15% more range than the A321LR, as well as 30% lower fuel burn per seat compared to competitors.

Deliveries of the first American Airlines A321XLR is expected in 2023.

Boeing Loses Ground In The US


The Airbus A321XLR has managed to sell over 160 units on the first three days of the Paris Air Show, putting enormous pressure on Boeing, who has not managed to announce its much expected NMA project.

The North American planemaker has officially lost a major customer in the USA, who historically operated the Boeing 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, 787, and 777.

Not only American Airlines will swap its old 757s with brand-new A321s; Delta Air Lines took the same path last year.

With the imminent retirement of the 757 and 767 from both American Airlines and Delta, new A321s will start to populate North America’s skies in, putting an end to a successful era of Boeing mid-range metal.

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James Field

James Field

James is a passionate AvGeek based in Manchester, U.K who has been actively spotting for years. James has been an Aviation Enthusiast for 8 years and has a fond likening to Concorde! James hopes to grow in the aviation industry with journalism being his primary focus.

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