Airways Magazine

Delta’s first 717 flight(s): Atlanta – Newark on September 19th

 Breaking News

Delta’s first 717 flight(s): Atlanta – Newark on September 19th

Delta’s first 717 flight(s): Atlanta – Newark on September 19th
July 18
18:04 2013

MIAMI — The Delta 717 flights to EWR have now been uploaded into the Amadeus GDS and will be gradually loaded onto Delta.com over the course of this weekend. As per the Airline Route blog, here are the schedules for the week of October 20th – the first full week when the 717 will operate all 11 daily Atlanta-Newark flights:

 

Flight # Route Depart Arrive Aircraft Days
2343 ATL-EWR 0730 0940 717 12345
401 ATL-EWR 0845 1100 717 1234567
1798 ATL-EWR 1000 1211 717 6
1798 ATL-EWR 1000 1213 717 12345
935 ATL-EWR 1115 1333 717 123457
1942 ATL-EWR 1230 1445 717 6
1942 ATL-EWR 1230 1450 717 123457
2042 ATL-EWR 1345 1606 717 123457
926 ATL-EWR 1505 1723 717 6
926 ATL-EWR 1505 1727 717 123457
2142 ATL-EWR 1630 1849 717 6
2142 ATL-EWR 1630 1851 717 123457
2242 ATL-EWR 1745 2005 717 6
2242 ATL-EWR 1745 2008 717 123457
504 ATL-EWR 1915 2130 717 6
504 ATL-EWR 1915 2133 717 123457
2415 ATL-EWR 2145 2356 717 123457
           
575 EWR-ATL 0630 0851 717 123456
807 EWR-ATL 0745 1007 717 6
807 EWR-ATL 0745 1009 717 123457
485 EWR-ATL 0900 1129 717 6
485 EWR-ATL 0900 1131 717 123457
2343 EWR-ATL 1030 1252 717 123457
401 EWR-ATL 1145 1404 717 123457
401 EWR-ATL 1145 1403 717 6
1798 EWR-ATL 1300 1525 717 6
1798 EWR-ATL 1300 1526 717 12345
673 EWR-ATL 1415 1636 717 123457
1942 EWR-ATL 1530 1750 717 6
1942 EWR-ATL 1530 1751 717 123457
2042 EWR-ATL 1645 1916 717 123457
926 EWR-ATL 1800 2029 717 6
926 EWR-ATL 1800 2030 717 123457
2142 EWR-ATL 1930 2159 717 123457

 

The seat map and technical specifications for Delta's new fleet of 717s. The 717s will feature in-seat power, wi-fi, and the same economy, economy comfort, and first class seats as the 737-900ER. The aircraft will be configured with 110 seats in a 3 class configuration (12F/15Y+/83Y). (Credits: Delta Air Lines)

The seat map and technical specifications for Delta’s new fleet of 717s. The 717s will feature in-seat power, wi-fi, and the same economy, economy comfort, and first class seats as the 737-900ER. The aircraft will be configured with 110 seats in a 3 class configuration (12F/15Y+/83Y). (Credits: Delta Air Lines)

Delta Air Lines has loaded its first schedules featuring the Boeing 717. According to Delta’s Desktop timetable application on the latest release, the first route to feature the 717 aircraft will be Atlanta-Newark, beginning on September 19th, 2013. The first flight scheduled to see 717 service is the 8:55 am departure, which will arrive into Newark at 11:07 am. 3 Atlanta-Newark flights that day are scheduled to be served with the 717, and between 1 and 3 Atlanta-Newark flights are scheduled with the 717 until October 6th, when the figure jumps to 6 or 7 out of 11 till October 19th, when every single Atlanta-Newark flight is scheduled with the 717. For the moment, Atlanta – Newark is the only route that sees service from the 717 till the end of November. As of this moment, the flights are not bookable through Delta.com (which still shows the A319 as operating all flights that show up as 717 in the desktop timetable) or the global distribution system (GDS). We will update the story when this changes.

Delta's fleet of 88 717s used to be operated by AirTran Airways, who is phasing out the type after merging with Southwest Airlines. (Credits: Mama Geek)

Delta’s fleet of 88 717s used to be operated by AirTran Airways, who is phasing out the type after merging with Southwest Airlines. (Credits: Mama Geek)

In July 2012 Delta decided to leased 88 used 717s from rival low cost carrier (LCC) AirTran Airways. The latter decided to phase out the type after merging with Dallas based LCC Southwest Airlines. Delta will be using its new fleet of 717s to replace the venerable Douglas DC 9-50s it inherited after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008. DC-9-50 retirements dates speculation range from the end of 2013 to sometime in 2014. Delta has yet to officially announce when they will finally go.

Delta is also using the 717s to replaces some of its inefficient 50-seat CRJ-200 fleet. Delta, the world’s largest airline by passengers flown, has been quite the contrarian in its fleet re-equipping strategy by taking on used aircraft such as MD-90s from China and continuing to fly older fuel-guzzling equipment that’s already paid for such as the DC-9-50 years after other airlines have ceased to operate them.

An ex-Northwest Delta Douglas DC-9 Series 50 photographed in Memphis in 2011. This airframe was built in 1975. (Credits: Author)

An ex-Northwest Delta Douglas DC-9 Series 50 photographed in Memphis in 2011. This airframe was built in 1975. (Credits: Author)

The cabin of a Delta DC-9-50 photographed in June 2011. Delta has refurbished the ex-NW DC-9s with new cabins and wi-fi. (Credits: Author)

The cabin of a Delta DC-9-50 photographed in June 2011. Delta has refurbished the ex-NW DC-9s with new cabins and wi-fi. (Credits: Author)

The 717 holds a significant operating cost advantage over the DC 9-50, especially in fuel burn and maintenance cost. The 88 717s will be delivered to Delta between August 2013 and December 2015 as shown in the graphic below. At the end of October 2013, Delta is scheduled to have 9 717s on property.

The delivery schedule for Delta's 717s

The delivery schedule for Delta’s 717s

At one time TWA operated the 717. Now, Hawaiian and Delta will eventually be the only 717 operators remaining in the United States 156 were built between 1998 and 2006. The aircraft entered service in late 1999 with AirTran, who used them to replace the DC-9-30s and became the world’s largest operator of the type. Hawaiian has discussed retiring their 717s late in this decade or early in the 2020s. It would seem Delta may be an ideal buyer or lessor.

The Boeing 717 was originally marketed as the McDonnell-Douglas MD-95 before the company merged with Boeing in 1997. (Credits: Author)

The Boeing 717 was originally marketed as the McDonnell-Douglas MD-95 before the company merged with Boeing in 1997. (Credits: McDonnell Douglas)

(Credits: McDonell Douglas)

(Credits: McDonnell Douglas)

 

Comments
0

About Author

Vinay Bhaskara

Vinay Bhaskara

Senior Business Analyst, Big Airline Enthusiast, Avid Airport Connoisseur, Frequent Flyer, Globetrotter. I Miss Northwest Airlines Every Day. vinay@airwaysmag.com @TheABVinay

Related Articles

Current Issue

Cart

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter

Polls

Would you feel safe flying on a Boeing 737 MAX once the grounding is lifted?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

@airwaysmagazine

Airways YouTube Channel

Polls

Would you feel safe flying on a Boeing 737 MAX once the grounding is lifted?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
0