MIAMI – Southwest Airlines (WN) CEO Gary Kelly announced his airline will be launching service to two US tourist destinations, Miami and Palm Springs. Kelly spoke in a short, concise video about the airline’s decision to expand to these airports.

The CEO says that adding these specific airports to WN’s route map would bring the carrier access to additional revenue at “a critical time. It matches our fleet with demand for very popular destinations.”

Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly. Video courtesy: Southwest Airlines

One City, Multiple Airports


In regards to adding another California destination, bringing the grand total to 11, Kelly adds, “Southwest has long carried more customers to, from, and within the Golden State than any other airline.”

Finally, speaking to WN’s habit of serving multiple airports in the same cities, Kelly says, “…and just as we serve multiple airports in metro areas across the country, South Florida is ripe for another one, and Miami will complement and augment the existing South Florida service we have to Fort Lauderdale (FLL) and West Palm Beach (PBI).”

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 N441WN. Photo: Nicholas Vitolano

A Positive Week for Southwest


Over the course of the pandemic, WN has lost approximately US$1bn and recently announced it would not furlough its employees this year. The airline has prided itself on being a customer-friendly, no-fare low-cost airline, serving both large metro destinations and their surrounding smaller airports in some cases.

This is a very positive week for WN, which also secured 34 slots into Long Beach Airport (LGB) in the surrounding Los Angeles metro area.

Kelly had optimistic words to wrap up his video, stating, “The unmatchable combination of your hospitality, our low fares, and our customer-friendly policies will make flying to these airports more affordable, and attainable. This is a time where consumers cheer access to the Southwest brand and our great value.”


Featured image: Southwest Airlines Boeing 737. Photo: Hiro Nishikura / @hiros.aviation.