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QANTAS to Push Out Airbus A380 Deliveries

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QANTAS to Push Out Airbus A380 Deliveries

QANTAS to Push Out Airbus A380 Deliveries
August 05
10:35 2016

MIAMI — According to a report from the Australian Business Traveler (AUSBT) QANTAS Airways CEO Alan Joyce said the carrier doesn’t want the remaining eight Airbus A380s on order, as the current super jumbo fleet is enough to meet the existing demand.

During the CAPA Australia Pacific Aviation Summit 2016 in Brisbane, Joyce admitted that the carrier’s intention is to “not taking those aircraft.”

Back in 2008, QANTAS was one of the first Airbus A380 customers, with an order placed for 20 aircraft. To date, 12 aircraft have been delivered. The airline has been pushing back the delivery of the remaining planes over two years now, joining other carriers including Air France, which has dropped an order for two, Air Austral, which discarded the plans to acquire two A380s previously ordered in 2009.

Virgin Atlantic, another A380 customer, has also pushed back the deliveries of six superjumbos on order. In the recent Farnborough Airshow, Virgin Group founder and figurehead Richard Branson stated at that time that the carrier is “still evaluating for the future whether or not to take delivery [of the A380s].”

Qantas operates its 484-seat A380s on routes from Sydney and Melbourne to London via Dubai, and to Hong Kong, Dallas and Los Angeles.

In its most recent forecast, Airbus predicted that 1,480 Very Large Aircraft (VLA) will be needed in the next 20 years. The airframer is still confident in the future of the superjumbo.

The recent cancellations leave Dubai-based Emirates as the main customer of the aircraft, with an order account equivalent to about 50% of the current production backlog.

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4 Comments

  1. Phoenix
    Phoenix August 05, 16:42

    Stick a fork in the deal, it’s done. Mr. Joyce could not make his intentions more clear. If I were Airbus, I would offer QS a compensation deal, perhaps including a swap to A350s and/or A330neos and call it a night.

  2. tedwja
    tedwja August 05, 23:12

    Excellent decision Qantas!

  3. Parker West
    Parker West August 06, 18:27

    The bottom line is positive for the 380 when it’s filled, otherwise it’s a losing proposition. Qantas can’t find the passenger demand to profit from the other 8 aircraft. They have decided on the 787-9 over the AirBus 350, so that’s not a option. The A380 can’t be used as a freighter, it wasn’t built with the body strength of the 747. If the divider that separates the two levels is removed the fuselage is too flimsy for flight. Tim Clark whose airline operates most of the A380s in use, has demanded a neo version of the airframe, which would require a minimum of $5-10 billion further invested in the project which makes zero sense. We were told the breakeven was 250, AirBus won’t come close. Both Airbus and Boeing misread the demand for the 380 and 747-8.

  4. BC
    BC August 12, 23:39

    I could see that one coming. I live in Brisbane and on QF flights to Europe they try to funnel you through Sydney or Melbourne just to try to fill the A380. The A380 was always a bad choice for Qantas as it doesn’t have a dominant hub in its own country, with the 3 largest cities on the east coast (Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane) all having a huge amount of choice for flights particularly to Asia and Europe. When facing a 22 hour flight to London the last thing you want to do is add another 4 hours to depart from a different Australian city when there are plenty of other options.

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