MIAMI – Effective Monday, May 17, Delta Air Lines (DL) will require all new hires to be vaccinated against COVID-19. DL has made significant strides toward achieving herd immunity in its organization, with more than 60% of staff having already been vaccinated.

As demand picks up, the new policy is a critical step to protect the airline’s employees and in turn its customers. If ticket sales rise and the economy improves, DL will be able and ready “to continue operating safely,” the airline says in a press release.

However, the carrier did state that it would not impose a company-wide policy requiring existing workers to be vaccinated, notwithstanding the requirement for new employees.

The news comes as POTUS declared yesterday, “The CDC is saying they have concluded that fully vaccinated people are at a very, very low risk of getting COVID-19. Therefore, if you’ve been fully vaccinated, you no longer need to wear a mask. Let me repeat: If you are fully vaccinated, you no longer need to wear a mask.”  

Delta Air Lines handing sanitizer while boarding back in November, 2020. Will fully vaccinated Delta crew and customers no longer be required to wear masks? Photo: Delta Air Lines.

Essential to the Future of the Airline


Delta highlights in the release that one out of 1,000 Americans has died from COVID-19, while approximately two out of 10 Americans have been vaccinated. Still, Even a person gets the virus after getting the jab, the vaccines are nearly 100% effective in preventing transmission in addition to diminishing the risk of hospitalization and death to almost nil.

Furthermore, vaccines are also extremely effective in preventing illness and symptoms related to COVID-19. As the airline states in the release, “Vaccines are safe, effective and essential to the future of the airline and our world.”

Do you agree that new DL hires will be required to get vaccinated? What do you think of the new policy at Delta? Leave your comment below or chime in our SM channels.


Featured image: Delta Air Lines N391DN Airbus A321-211 (Thank You livery). Photo: Nick Sheeder/Airways