American Airlines announced Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, that the initial route for the 787 Dreamliner will be Dallas-Fort Worth to Chicago, O'Hare, Dallas-Fort Worth to Beijing and Buenos Aires, Argentina.

MIAMI — American Airlines’ three initial routes for its new Boeing 787 fleet will be out of its Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport hub to Chicago O’Hare, along with Beijing and Buenos Aires.

The 787 will launch between DFW and O’Hare on May 7. It will then start international flights from DFW to Beijing on June 2 and Buenos Aires on June 4. The 787-8 launch happens to coincide with the one-year anniversary of American retiring the Boeing 767-200 from its fleet.

An American Airlines 787 exterior. (Credits: JDL Multimedia)
An American Airlines 787 exterior. (Credits: American Airlines)

First Flights


The inaugural American Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner flight will be AA2320. The flight will depart Dallas/Ft. Worth at 7:10 AM CT on Thursday, May 7. The flight is currently scheduled to arrive in Chicago at 9:36 AM CT. The aircraft will then return back to DFW as AA2320; it will depart ORD at 12:10 PM CT, and it will arrive at DFW at 2:57 PM CT. American will also operate one round trip evening flight with the 787 between the two cities.

More Details


Howard Mann is a new vice president at Alexandria, Virginia-based Campbell-Hill Aviation Group. “It’s not a surprise that the first route is a hub to hub one, mainly for crew training. This is pretty standard,” he said.

It hasn’t been announced, but it’s a guess that the 787 pilot base will be at  DFW, said Mann. “In terms of routes, American has done a lot of expansion from DFW to Asia, including Beijing starting in May with a Boeing 777-200ER,” he said. “If bookings on that route should slow down, the 787 is a good option for American. The 787 also allows American to show off its newest aircraft for business travelers and corporate accounts.”

Looking at Buenos Aires, that route potentially has a lot of passengers, but not quite at the capacity of a 777-200, said Mann. “While Argentina’s economy isn’t doing well, but it’s still important to serve the country from the DFW hub.”

American Airlines has also revealed what 787 cabin will look like, calling it a state-of-the-art onboard travel experience. The 787, in a two-class configuration, will feature 28 fully lie-flat business class seats in the popular 1-2-1 configuration, which the carrier calls “a huge selling point.” The seat, custom designed by American’s Onboard Products team and manufactured by Zodiac, features forward and rear-facing direct-aisle access for every customer. It also includes satellite Wi-Fi capability provided by Panasonic.

The business class cabin onboard American Airlines’ 787. Image (Credits: American Airlines)
The business class cabin onboard American Airlines’ 787.  (Credits: American Airlines)

In the passenger experience area, business class  also features inflight entertainment selections on a 15.4-inch HD Panasonic touchscreen monitor, with Bose QuietComfort Acoustic Noise Cancelling headphones and ear buds. Each seat has universal AC power outlets and a USB jack. The carrier’s 787-8s will also feature a walk-up bar stocked with snacks and refreshments.

Economy class will have 48 Main Cabin Extra seats in a 3-3-3 configuration with up to six inches of extra legroom, along with 150 main cabin seats in the same 3-3-3 configuration. Seat will have a 9-inch HD Panasonic touchscreen monitor with assorted movies, TV programs, games and audio selections. Each seat is also equipped with universal AC power outlets and a USB jack.

American-Airlines-787-Main-Cabin (1)
The Main Cabin onboard American Airlines’ 787. (Credits: American Airlines)

Jason Rabinowitz is the data research manager for Routehappy and an industry observer on the airline passenger experience. He noted that business class on American’s 787s is very similar to what was done on its refurbished 777s.

“It has the 1-2-1 configuration with the forward and backward seats. It’s interesting, because not a lot of airlines are doing this configuration,” said Rabinowitz. “I’m not saying that this is a bad approach, because people seem to like it. American’s business class looks fantastic and is pretty standard for its new fleet.”

Economy on the 787 will have the 3-3-3 configuration, which isn’t a surprise, said Rabinowitz. “It’s cramped, with the standard international pitch, and there will be people who recommend not flying on aircraft with the 3-3-3 configuration,” he said. “While all the other amenities are nice, the seat width will be problematic for some, which has become the industry norm for the 787.”

The 787 will be a flagship aircraft for American, similar to its role in the United Airlines fleet, said Mann. “Looking at United, it used the 787 to open routes like San Francisco-Chengdu and Denver-Tokyo. It also used the 787 to right-size routes like Houston-Lagos, and also on flagship routes like Houston-London Heathrow,” he said.

American Airlines has placed firm orders for 42 Boeing 787s, with rights to acquire an additional 58. Although there is no definitive delivery schedule at this point, a spokesman said it expects to take delivery of 12 787-8s this year, three in each quarter. It doesn’t have a set date on other route announcements, he added. The carrier will also receive its first of 22 Airbus A350s in 2017, as part of an order it inherited from US Airways.