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AM2431 Durango Crash: Pilot in Control Unqualified

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AM2431 Durango Crash: Pilot in Control Unqualified

André Du-pont

AM2431 Durango Crash: Pilot in Control Unqualified
February 26
13:00 2019

Article Written by Thomas Saunders


LONDON – During the investigation into the Aeroméxico Connect Flight 2431 flight, it has transpired that the pilot in the right-hand seat was not type rated for the Embraer E190 according to FlightGlobal.  

He did, however, hold the required ratings for flying a Beech King Air.

Aispuro commented that the left wing of the twin-engine jet initially touched the ground, causing the plane to lose both engines.

Then he said that the plane skidded off the runway at General Guadalupe Victoria International Airport, stopping about 300 meters (1,000 feet) away.

Back in August 2018, Aeromexico commented on this incident.

“Our heart is with those affected and their families. We are deeply saddened by this incident, and we would like to assure everyone that Group Aeromexico (is) offering its support, thoughts, and prayers to those affected and their families. We are doing everything in our reach to assist them and their families,” shared Andres Conesa, Chief Executive Officer of Aeromexico.

Conesa has assumed responsibility for the costs of the several damages and determined that the 10-year-old Embraer E190 that suffered the accident has been with Aeromexico for four years.

This individual was in the initial phase of the type rating for the E190, having started the theoretical phase of the rating, and also 64 hours of simulator time.

Of the 103 people on board, 85 people were injured in the crash, however, everyone survived.  

After the crash, the aircraft caught fire and the aircraft was written off.

The investigation has also discovered several indications that are indicative of wind shear, one of which is a discrepancy between the Captain’s and First Officer’s speed indicators, with the Captain’s showing 152kts, whereas the First Officer’s showed 148kts at the moment of rotation.  

The gear up command was given at 2ft, rather than the 1500ft which the company Standard Operating Procedures state during wind shear conditions.

The aircraft’s weight and balance were within limits, and there is no evidence of a technical or engine fault.

This accident has certainly taken an interesting turn and will be something to watch further.

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