MIAMI – National carrier Air Serbia (JU) has returned to Geneva after a 36-year hiatus. On March 1, a traditional water cannon salute welcomed flight JU470.

The flight was operated by an Airbus A319, configured with eight business class and 136-economy seats. This was followed by an official ribbon-cutting ceremony, attended by André Schneider, Geneva-Cointrin Airport’s (GVA) CEO, and Bojan Aranđelović, Head of Network Planning, Air Serbia.

The twice-weekly service from Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport (BEG) will operate on Mondays and Fridays. The airline has timed the flights to allow perfect connectivity for passengers to various destinations in its network including Athens, Larnaca, Moscow, Sofia, Thessaloniki, Tirana, and Tivat.

Photo: Geneva Airport

Swiss Success


Switzerland is a crucial market for the JU. Indeed the carrier is also increasing its Zurich flights from five weekly to daily. It will also up capacity with the introduction of its 174-seat A320 on some rotations.

“We are glad that, despite the current circumstances, we had managed to further expand the network of destinations and contribute to even better connectivity between Serbia and Switzerland. Having in mind that more than 30,000 Serbian citizens live in western Switzerland and neighboring France, we have recognized the need for introducing this [Geneva] route, in order to provide them with easier access and better connectivity with their homeland,” said Jiri Marek, General Manager Commercial and Strategy, Air Serbia. 

Air Serbia YU-APB Airbus A319-132. Photo: Milan Witham/Airways

Delayed Start


Air Serbia had announced the new route back in March 2020, along with Florence, Amman, Rostov, Lviv and Chisinau. However, plans had to be temporarily abandoned due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Geneva launch came after easyJet (U2) temporarily suspended its twice-weekly link between the two cities until March 5. The carrier last served GVA back in 1985, while still operating as JAT Yugoslavian Airways.


Featured image: Air Serbia YU-APK Airbus A319-132. Photo: Roberto Leiro/Airways